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Last night was the second week of my fall 2017 Comics Studio workshop. It’s the third time I’ve taught this class, and it’s different every time.

One of the exercises from last night was:

“Draw a comic that answers the following questions,
1. What is fear?
2. Where is it located?
3. How do you conquer it?”

I often participate in these exercises along with the students. Here is what I made for this one:

fear.jpeg

Even though I plan the exercises, I am often surprised at what comes out of them. My students are thoughtful and creative and brave. They come up with things I never would have expected. They inspire me, and I try to be as in the moment as they are, only drawing what comes to me in that moment.

Try this exercise, if you like.

What is fear?
Where is is located?
How do you conquer it?

 

 

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i’m teaching a comics workshop!

me drawing comix

Guys! I’m teaching a comics workshop! Autobiographical Comics, with IS183 of the Berkshires:

Comics serve as a powerful tool for exploring our experiences and sharing our stories, using both image and text. In this course we will start with some basics of graphic storytelling: panel structure, rhythm, and the relationship between words and pictures, building towards each student creating their own autobiographical comic. Using examples from contemporary cartoonists, along with group exercises, you will have the chance to experiment and find your voice as you work towards a final project.

Price: $140
Member Price: $120
Lesson Info: Tuesdays, 6 to 8PM February 23 to March 22 (5 Meetings) Location: exPRESS Gallery, North Adams
Department: Graphic Storytelling
Instructors: Anna Moriarty-Lev
First Lesson: Tue, Feb 23 2016

This course is for ANYONE who wants to make comics. Beginners are HIGHLY encouraged. No previous drawing experience needed. If you want to make comics and you have a story to tell, this class is for you.

I passionately believe that anyone can make comics. You don’t need expensive supplies, or any kind of art training. What you do need is a desire to tell a story with words and pictures. And you need a piece of paper and a pen or pencil. That’s it.

Telling our own stories is a deeply human desire, and it’s how we learn about what it means to be human. Making comics can be a really fun and healing way to process your own experience. Whether it’s something difficult you’re going through, or just funny moments with your friends and family, making comics about it creates a window into your specific viewpoint.

Let’s make comics!